Making a Difference in Colorectal Cancer Care

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Colorectal cancer big killer

Health care providers play a critical role in raising awareness of colorectal cancer and increasing screening among patients. Patients rely on their doctors for guidance as they make decisions regarding their health.

Colorectal cancer has the third highest cancer mortality rate in both men and women in the United States.1,2 It is expected to cause approximately 49,700 deaths in the United States during 2015.3

These mortality figures are troubling because colorectal cancer can often be successfully treated if caught early.

  • As many as 60% of deaths from colorectal cancer could be prevented through early detection and removal of precancerous polyps if everyone 50 years of age or older had regular screening.4
  • Approximately 9 out of every 10 people whose colorectal cancer is found early and treated are still alive 5 years later3

 can treat cancer

By encouraging patients to get colorectal cancer screenings as recommended, health care providers can help reduce the mortality rate. Providers have the opportunity to help make a difference by talking to patients about the importance of colorectal cancer screening.   

The Impact of Early Colorectal Cancer Detection

Already, increased screening rates and improvements in early detection and treatment have made a distinct impact on the rates of colorectal cancer across the country.1 According to a report from the American Cancer Society:

  • Colorectal cancer incidence and death rates have been decreasing and are expected to
    continue declining1
  • Although the new cases are diagnosed each year, from 2006 to 2010 the rates of death from colorectal cancer nationwide declined by 2.5% per year in men and by 3.0% per year in women5

Rates of death from colon cancer have declined from 2006 to 2010

Although the incidence is declining, it is still important to educate patients on the importance of colorectal cancer screening.

 

References

  1. Colorectal Cancer Facts & Figures 2014-2016. Atlanta, GA: American Cancer Society; 2014. American Cancer Society Pub. No. 861714. American Cancer Society website. http://www.cancer.org/acs/groups/content/documents/document/acspc-042280.pdf. Accessed February 19, 2015.
  2. Colorectal cancer. American Cancer Society website. http://www.cancer.org/acs/groups/cid/documents/webcontent/003096-pdf.pdf. Accessed June 20, 2014.
  3. Cancer Facts & Figures 2015. Atlanta, GA: American Cancer Society; 2015. American Cancer Society Pub. No. 500815. American Cancer Society website. http:[email protected]/documents/document/acspc-044552.pdf. Accessed February 19, 2015.
  4. Basic information about colorectal cancer. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.  
    http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/basic_info/index.htm. Accessed June 20, 2014. 
  5. Cancer Facts & Figures 2014. Atlanta, GA: American Cancer Society; 2014. American Cancer Society Pub. No. 500813. American Cancer Society website. http:[email protected]/documents/webcontent/acspc-042151.pdf. Accessed June 20, 2014.

About the Initiative

The Love Your Colon initiative was created to help increase awareness of colorectal cancer and the importance of screening.

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Helpful Resources

 

Download materials that can provide your patients with helpful background on colorectal cancer and                                     screenings.

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